OTTER® ScrewFix screws - Handy Hints.

Click on the links below to reveal some very handy hints when using OTTER® ScrewFix:

Decking handy hints:

When fixing timber decking (generally a hardwood or treated pine timber) it will depend on the surface area as to how many screws are required. For example;

  • 900 lineal metres of decking timber laid across timber joists at 450mm spacing with two screws at every joist intersection will require 4000 screws
  • Calculation:
    = Number of Lineal metres x By the number of screws at every joist intersection
       Joist spacing
    = total numbers of screws required

    Example:

    = 900 lineal metres x 2 screws per intersection
       0.450 (joist spacing @ 450mm)
    = 4000 screws

Types of screws designed for decking applications:

  • OTTER® 316 Marine Grade Stainless Steel decking screws have the longest life span as well as providing an aesthetic finish appeal. They are designed to withstand the toughest environmental conditions and are ideally suited situations where is there is exposure to salt water, chlorinated water or constant wet environments.
  • OTTER® Treated Pine (Chipboard Galvanized) screws. Treated Pine screws are galvanized for long life, wear and durability. They are ideal for general applications where conditions aren't so extreme.

Typical screw length applications:

  • For fixing 22mm thick decking timber to hardwood joists - recommended length is 50mm length screws.
  • For fixing 22mm thick decking timber to treated pine joists - recommended length is 65mm length screws.

Missing a screw on your kitchen cupboard hinge?

Where your kitchen cupboard is constructed from chipboard or MDF it's recommended to use OTTER® Zinc Particle Board screws, which are available in handy blister packs sizes for your convenience.

If however, your kitchen cupboards are solid timber, it's best to use OTTER® Wood screws.

Plasterboard repairs or replacement

Repairs: General rule of thumb is to use OTTER® Plasterboard screws 25mm in length to fix 12mm plasterboard to wall studs and 32mm plasterboard screws when fixing ceiling plasterboard to ceiling joists.

Replacements: General rule of thumb is to use OTTER® Plasterboard screws 25mm in length to fix 12mm plasterboard to wall studs and 32mm plasterboard screws when fixing ceiling plasterboard to ceiling joists - in conjunction with plasterboard adhesive. NB: Please consult the plasterboard manufacturers fixing instructions when carrying out repairs or replacement work.

Fixing timber pickets to steel frame (and gates)

There are two OTTER® products suitable for this application;

  1. OTTER® Steel Countersunk Galvanized self drilling: Only the picket is required to be pre-drilled, so that the thread of the screw does not bind on the timber and the screws will self drill into the steel.

    OR

  2. OTTER® Steel Wing tip Galvanized self drilling: there is no need to pre-drill at all. NB. The screw will self drill a pilot hole into the timber and drill into the steel.

Roofing application: Fixing polycarbonate sheeting to timber (Image to accompany)

OTTER® polycarbonate screws 12g x 50mm; are designed to fix all brands of polycarbonate roofing and are manufactured to exacting Australian Standards AS 3566. Available in packs of 50 or 200.

When fixing polycarbonate roofing to timber you are required to pre-drill a 10mm expansion hole in sheets under 2.4 metres in length and a 12mm hole in sheets over 2.4 metres in length. OTTER® polycarbonate screws are designed with a self drilling type 17 point which self drills into the timber and a dome seal to weather proof the fixing point / roof line.

NB: Please consult polycarbonate manufacturer's specifications for installation instructions.

Fixing corrugated roofing to timber or metal:

To Timber:
OTTER® Type 17 Galvanized Roofing screws are designed to fix all brands of corrugated roofing and is manufactured to exacting Australian Standards AS.3566. When fixing corrugated roofing to timber you do not need to pre-drill a hole in the corrugated roofing sheets or the timber. OTTER® Type 17 Galvanized Roofing screws are designed with a self drilling type 17 point which self drills into the timber and a neoprene seal to weather proof the fixing point / roof line. They are best applied using a cordless screw driver or drill. When drilling the screw through the corrugated sheet into the timber, remember to keep the drilling pressure constant until the screw seats itself into the timber without distorting the neoprene seal.

OTTER® Type 17 Galvanized Roofing screws are available in a range of coloured heads and sizes to suits your corrugated cladding colour selection.

NB: Please consult the roofing manufacturer's specifications for installation instructions.

To Metal:
OTTER® Drill Point Galvanized Roofing screws are designed to fix all brands of corrugated roofing and is manufactured to exacting Australian Standards AS 3566. When fixing corrugated roofing to metal you do not need to pre-drill a hole in the corrugated roofing sheets or the metal. OTTER® Drill Point Galvanized Roofing screws are designed with a self drilling point which self drills into the metal and a neoprene seal to weather proof the fixing point / roof line. They are best applied using a cordless screw driver or drill. When drilling the screw through the corrugated sheet into the metal, remember to keep the drilling pressure constant until the screw seats itself into the metal without distorting the neoprene seal.

OTTER® Drill Point Galvanized Roofing screws are available in a range of coloured heads and sizes to suits your corrugated cladding colour selection.

NB: Please consult the roofing manufacturer's specifications for installation instructions.

Choosing the right screw length:

When choosing the screw length take into consideration the type of timber being used (softwood or hardwood) and what you are wanting to hold. Ideally the screw should be at least 2 times longer when fixing into hardwood base than the top timber being held, and from 2 to 3 times longer when fixing into softwood base , although this is not always possible.

Handy Hint: To make it easier to drive the screw into the timber, rub a piece of soap onto the thread. This lubricates the thread as it cuts its way into the timber.

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